Rear wheel alignment question - 2017+ Kawasaki Z650 Forum
 
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post #1 of 4 (permalink) Old 02-24-2018, 11:19 AM Thread Starter
Naz
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Rear wheel alignment question

Hi guys, so I adjusted my chain yesterday, it was just at 40mm slack after 1550km(1000m). I lined up the swing arm
Lines, position 2 on both sides. I then measured from the center of the swing arm pivot and the center of the axel on both sides and got 500mm on the left and 505mm on the right. If I set it so both sides are 500mm, the right side is sitting at position line 3. What should I do?
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post #2 of 4 (permalink) Old 02-24-2018, 08:18 PM
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Mine measures 560 mm on both sides (at 1.25 increments back from the loosest mark). Your 500 mm number is off, but it is the 5 mm discrepancy that is pertinent here. There are five different ways to check the alignment, and, in theory, all five should agree:
i) chain-adjustment marks on swing arms agree
ii) axle center to swing-arm pivot distances agree
iii) front and rear sprockets are in the same plane
iv) front and rear tires aligned (when front wheel is straight)
v) bike tracks straight while you ride on a flat road when bike is vertical and you let go of the handle bars

On my last bike, the swing-arm marks were unreliable because the pointer clip could rock (rotate about axle when the axle nut was loosened) to move the pointer +/- half an increment. When I adjusted the chain on the Z650, I thought the pointer clip was less sloppy, but I did not actively try to rock it. If your nut is still loose, see if the pointer can be moved by rocking the plastic piece CW or CCW.

To check the tire alignment on my last bike, I used a ProAligner. It's just a specialized ruler for eyeballing (with one eye) the tires and comparing measurements between the right and left sides. (The ProAligner company may have gone out of business, since their website gives an error. This tool was referenced in an article in Cycle World magazine -- March 2011, p. 77.) To double check the tire alignment, I messed around with a laser -- the beam skimming the edge of the rear tire and pointing forward, then referenced to the front tire -- and I was satisfied.

Once the alignment is verified (by whatever method), always turn the chain adjustment nuts by exactly the same angle on each side (e.g., tighten by a 90-degree turn of the nut on each side), and your alignment should stay spot-on over the life of the chain.

Good luck and keep us informed about what you learn.

Last edited by nedfromPA; 02-24-2018 at 08:22 PM.
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post #3 of 4 (permalink) Old 02-25-2018, 06:55 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nedfromPA View Post
Mine measures 560 mm on both sides (at 1.25 increments back from the loosest mark). Your 500 mm number is off, but it is the 5 mm discrepancy that is pertinent here. There are five different ways to check the alignment, and, in theory, all five should agree:
i) chain-adjustment marks on swing arms agree
ii) axle center to swing-arm pivot distances agree
iii) front and rear sprockets are in the same plane
iv) front and rear tires aligned (when front wheel is straight)
v) bike tracks straight while you ride on a flat road when bike is vertical and you let go of the handle bars

On my last bike, the swing-arm marks were unreliable because the pointer clip could rock (rotate about axle when the axle nut was loosened) to move the pointer +/- half an increment. When I adjusted the chain on the Z650, I thought the pointer clip was less sloppy, but I did not actively try to rock it. If your nut is still loose, see if the pointer can be moved by rocking the plastic piece CW or CCW.

To check the tire alignment on my last bike, I used a ProAligner. It's just a specialized ruler for eyeballing (with one eye) the tires and comparing measurements between the right and left sides. (The ProAligner company may have gone out of business, since their website gives an error. This tool was referenced in an article in Cycle World magazine -- March 2011, p. 77.) To double check the tire alignment, I messed around with a laser -- the beam skimming the edge of the rear tire and pointing forward, then referenced to the front tire -- and I was satisfied.

Once the alignment is verified (by whatever method), always turn the chain adjustment nuts by exactly the same angle on each side (e.g., tighten by a 90-degree turn of the nut on each side), and your alignment should stay spot-on over the life of the chain.

Good luck and keep us informed about what you learn.
Thanks for the detailed reply. You are correct, 500/505 is incorrect, It measures 565/560. I just started from scratch, put both the markers back at position one and turned the adjuster nuts equally. I'm now at 565 both sides,chain slack at 25mm. However, the right side marker is ever so slightly different from the left. I'm happy to go with the pivot to axel nut measurement. Just completed a 240km ride and everything seems fine.
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post #4 of 4 (permalink) Old 02-25-2018, 01:23 PM
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Get one of these alignment tools. Best $13 bucks you can spend.

http://amzn.to/2GKooPM

Bored? Looking for info? Check here: www.tremonte.tv
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